RIDOH Reports First Human Case of West Nile Virus in 2022


The Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH) is announcing Rhode Island’s first human case of West Nile Virus in 2022. West Nile Virus is spread to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito.

The person who tested positive was a resident of Providence County in their 70s and is currently hospitalized after starting to experience symptoms of West Nile Virus almost three weeks ago.

 

Connecticut has confirmed one West Nile Virus cases in a human and Massachusetts has confirmed four human cases this year. The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) has confirmed two positive findings for West Nile Virus in mosquito traps this year.

Common symptoms of West Nile Virus include fever, headache, body aches, nausea, vomiting, and sometimes swollen lymph glands or a skin rash. Although many people who are infected with West Nile Virus show no symptoms, symptoms last for some people for several days or several weeks.

“The best way to prevent West Nile Virus and other mosquito-borne diseases is to prevent mosquitoes from breeding and to avoid mosquito bites,” said Interim Director of Health Utpala Bandy, MD, MPH. “Mosquitoes breed in water, so you should get rid of anything around your house and yard that collects water, such as tires, planters, and old trash cans or recycling bins. You should use repellent, and also wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants when you are outside, especially at sunrise and sunset. A few simple precautions can help you stay healthy and safe when you are outdoors spending quality time with family and friends.”

Protect yourself:

 

  • Put screens on windows and doors. Fix screens that are loose or have holes.
  • At sunrise and sundown (when mosquitoes are most active), consider rescheduling outdoor activities. If you must be outside, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants and use bug spray.
  • Use EPA-approved bug spray with one of the following active ingredients: DEET (20-30% strength); picaridin, IR3535; and oil of lemon eucalyptus or paramenthane. Do not use bug spray with DEET on infants under two months of age. Children should be careful not to rub their eyes after bug spray has been applied on their skin. Wash children's hands with soap and water to remove any bug spray when they return indoors.

 

Get rid of mosquito breeding grounds:

 

  • Get rid of anything around your house and yard that collects water. Just one cup of water can produce hundreds of mosquitoes.
  • Clean your gutters and downspouts so that they can drain properly.
  • Remove any water from unused swimming pools, wading pools, boats, planters, trash and recycling bins, tires, and anything else that collects water, and cover them.
  • Remove or treat any shallow water that can accumulate on top of a pool cover.
  • Change the water in birdbaths at least once a week and rinse out birdbaths once a week.

 

More information about mosquito prevention is available online.

 

 

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